Fort Dobbs Ready to Begin Construction

Fort Dobbs Ready to Begin Construction

 

The Friends of Fort Dobbs announced Thursday that the reconstruction of the French and Indian War fort is about to begin. After several years of planning and a grassroots fundraising campaign, the organization has achieved their goal to begin the first phase of the project.

 Fort Dobbs was a three-story log building that housed 50 soldiers during the 1750s and helped to guard the new settlement on North Carolina's frontier. The original structure disappeared into farmland centuries ago, but research and archaeology have fueled efforts to preserve the site and to re-built the 8,000 square foot structure. As a State Historic Site, Fort Dobbs is the only site in North Carolina at which the public can learn about the state's role in the first global war.

 At Thursday's ground breaking ceremony, Secretary Susan Kluttz of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources thanked the Friends of Fort Dobbs for their tireless fundraising efforts and acknowledged the benefits of the public-private partnership between the non-profit group and the State.  Senator Andrew Brock and Representative Rena Turner received thanks on behalf of the legislature for that body's recent appropriation of $150,000 toward the total construction cost.

 The first phase of the reconstruction will include the building's foundation, chimney and the first three courses of wall logs.         

 

       

Press Release: "Cherokee Attack on Fort Dobbs"

PRESS RELEASE

 

Release: Immediate                                                                                                    Contact: Scott Douglas

Date:     2/5/16                                                                                                                    Phone: 704-873-5882

                                                                                                                                               

Cherokee Attack on Fort Dobbs

February 27-28

 

STATESVILLE, N.C. – Fort Dobbs State Historic Site will offer a glimpse of the harrowing days of the Anglo-Cherokee War on February 27-28.  The Cherokee had been allies of the British when the French and Indian War started in 1754, but tensions quickly spiraled into war.  The soldiers at the fort and local settlers were attacked by dozens of warriors in a confusing night time skirmish on Feb. 27. 1760.

The 256th anniversary program will feature living history interpreters portraying provincial soldiers and settlers.  Musket and cannon firing demonstrations, as well as ongoing demonstrations of 18th century military camp life will be featured.  The free program will run 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on Sunday.  A special evening firing demonstration will be held at 6:30 p.m. Saturday.

For more information, call (704) 873-5882 or visit www.fortdobbs.org.

 About Fort Dobbs

Fort Dobbs State Historic Site’s mission is to preserve and interpret the history of Fort Dobbs and North Carolina’s role in the French and Indian War. It is open Tuesday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Special events and living history weekends are offered throughout the year. It is part of the Division of N.C. State Historic Sites within the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan Kluttz, NCDNCR's mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development.

NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C.  Zoo, the nation's first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov. ###

Militia On-the-Ready Training Event at Fort Dobbs July 23-24

Pat McCrory, Governor                                                    Susan Kluttz, Secretary

Marketing and Communications Office

News Release

Contact: Scott Douglas (704) 873-5882                Release:  June 27, 2016                                    Fay Mitchell (919) 807-7389                                                                                                                                                                               

Militia On-the-Ready Training Event at Fort Dobbs July 23-24

Statesville, N.C. – Able-bodied men ages 16-60 were required by North Carolina law to serve in the colony’s militia in the 1750s. They gathered several times a year for military training and could be called away at any time, leaving homes and businesses to the defend the colony. Fort Dobbs State Historic Site will feature living history interpreters recreating an 18th century militia muster July 23-24.

Military training was part of life for the citizen soldiers, and the muster re-enactment will portray residents of “Fourth Creek Settlement,” as Statesville then was known. The presentation will feature musket firing demonstrations, demonstrations of cooking and military camp life. Period music will fill the air. Visitors will be invited to join the ranks and learn marching drill each day at 1:30 p.m.

The free program will run 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. For additional information, please call (704) 873-5882. Fort Dobbs is within the Division of State Historic Sites in the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

About Fort Dobbs

Fort Dobbs State Historic Site’s mission is to preserve and interpret the history of Fort Dobbs and North Carolina’s role in the French and Indian War. It is open Tuesday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Special events and living history weekends are offered throughout the year. It is part of the Division of N.C. State Historic Sites within the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state's natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan Kluttz, NCDNCR's mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state's history, conserving the state's natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development.

 NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette's Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C. Zoo, the nation's first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

 ###

Press Release: “War for Empire” Brought to Life

PRESS RELEASE

Release: Immediate                                                                                                    Contact: Scott Douglas

Date:     3/26/16                                                                                                                 Phone: 704-873-5882

                                                                                                                                               

“War for Empire” Brought to Life

 

STATESVILLE, N.C. – Fort Dobbs State Historic Site will offer a window to the past April 16-17; back to the 1750’s when North Carolina found itself engaged in a global struggle for empire between England and France and neighboring native tribes such as the Cherokee.

The April “War for Empire” event will allow visitors to meet soldiers, American Indians and civilians from the 18th Century as the French and Indian War history of North Carolina is illustrated through encampments, trades demonstrations, musical performances, and battle reenactments.  Vendors of reproduction period items will also be on hand. 

 The programs will run 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on Sunday with highlighted activities throughout each day, including a battle re-enactment at 1:30 Saturday and 1:00 Sunday.  Admission is $3.00 per person, though children under 5 years old are free.

For more information, call (704) 873-5882 or visit www.fortdobbs.org.

About Fort Dobbs

Fort Dobbs State Historic Site’s mission is to preserve and interpret the history of Fort Dobbs and North Carolina’s role in the French and Indian War. It is open Tuesday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Special events and living history weekends are offered throughout the year. It is part of the Division of N.C. State Historic Sites within the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan Kluttz, NCDNCR's mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development.

NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C.  Zoo, the nation's first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov. ###

Fort Dobbs: Past and Present

For most of the last 250 years, the site of Fort Dobbs has been a relatively quiet place.  In recent years however, the site has had an exponentially growing energy and many exciting plans are in the works which will profoundly change the perception and knowledge of its hilltop location in Iredell County.

The fort had been constructed in 1756 as a barracks for 50 soldiers whose mission was to guard the western settlements of the British colony of North Carolina during the French and Indian War.  It was a substantial building, even by modern standards: a three-story blockhouse hewn out of stout oak timber which encompassed 8,000 square feet of interior space.  Soldiers slept, cooked, and stored supplies within its walls.  The fort served as a center of defensive efforts on the frontier and during its seven years of active service, was the scene of a battle (February 27, 1760) between colonial forces and Cherokee Indians whose lands bordered those of the British.

With the defeat of both the Cherokee and the French, North Carolina’s frontier expanded to the west, rendering the fort useless.  The structure was abandoned and allowed to rot.  During the succeeding decades, the remains of the building were scavenged for construction materials and the site was completely cleared for farmland by the turn of the 19th century.  Part of the site was preserved by the Fort Dobbs Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution who convinced the State of North Carolina to conduct the first of several archaeological investigations which have unearthed thousands of relics of the past while shedding new light on the fort itself and the lives of those who lived there. 

In 1976, Fort Dobbs opened to the public as a State Historic Site and is now part of the state’s Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.  Today, the site is open five days per week for tours and hosts several living history “re-enactments” among other events which serve to breathe life into the story of North Carolina’s role in the first global war.

Over the past decade, a major effort has been spearheaded by the non-profit Friends of Fort Dobbs to reconstruct the 18th century blockhouse.  Architectural plans have been designed with the help of historians and archaeologists and those plans have been fully approved by the State.  The Friends have successfully completed a new modern bathroom facility and are steadily working to raise the private funds needed to rebuild the fort.  The reconstructed fort will serve as a full-scale living history “exhibit” which will allow visitors to interact with the soldiers, settlers, and American Indians of the 1750’s in a period setting and learn about their lives.  Only 12 other forts from the war have been restored in the United States and very few are in the south-eastern part of the country.  Fort Dobbs is the only State Historic Site in North Carolina which covers this tumultuous period of American history.

For more information about visiting the site, special events, and the reconstruction effort, please visit www.fortdobbs.org.  A special event on February 27-28, 2016 will commemorate the Cherokee attack through displays of period camp life and weapons firing demonstrations.