Musket Raffle

 

The Friends of Fort Dobbs invite you to participate in a raffle for  a fully functioning replica of a .75 flintlock musket.

 

The 1728 Long Land Pattern was one type of firelock issued to British troops during the French and Indian War.

 

All proceeds from the event will help support educational programming  and events at Fort Dobbs.

 

Tickets are on sale now! The raffle will be on Sunday, April 9, at 2:30 pm, during Fort Dobbs State Historic Site’s annual War for Empire event.

You do not have to be present to win.

 

Ticket Prices

1 – $10.00 5 - $40.00 11-$90.00

 

To Purchase Tickets

Visit Fort Dobbs State Historic Site Tuesday – Saturday from 9 – 5

Order by phone (704-873-5882) or e-mail (info@fortdobbs.org)

Fort Dobbs State Historic Site

438 Fort Dobbs Rd

Statesville, NC 28625

Fort Dobbs on PBS

Fort Dobbs State Historic Site was featured on WTVI’s series Trail of History which is hosted by Gary Ritter and explores the historic figures and events that have influenced the Charlotte region.

Trail of History filmed at Fort Dobbs during the historic site’s annual “War for Empire” re-enactment in April, as well as during an archaeological excavation this summer.  Through interviews with staff, volunteers, and other historic professionals, the episode provides an overview of the history of Fort Dobbs, its role in the global French and Indian War, and the process by which archaeological evidence is collected.

“We feel very honored to have the story of Fort Dobbs shared with a wider audience,“ said Site Manager Scott Douglas.  The episode is available to watch here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uoc585PszTk&feature=youtu.be

Fort Dobbs Ready to Begin Construction

Fort Dobbs Ready to Begin Construction

 

The Friends of Fort Dobbs announced Thursday that the reconstruction of the French and Indian War fort is about to begin. After several years of planning and a grassroots fundraising campaign, the organization has achieved their goal to begin the first phase of the project.

 Fort Dobbs was a three-story log building that housed 50 soldiers during the 1750s and helped to guard the new settlement on North Carolina's frontier. The original structure disappeared into farmland centuries ago, but research and archaeology have fueled efforts to preserve the site and to re-built the 8,000 square foot structure. As a State Historic Site, Fort Dobbs is the only site in North Carolina at which the public can learn about the state's role in the first global war.

 At Thursday's ground breaking ceremony, Secretary Susan Kluttz of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources thanked the Friends of Fort Dobbs for their tireless fundraising efforts and acknowledged the benefits of the public-private partnership between the non-profit group and the State.  Senator Andrew Brock and Representative Rena Turner received thanks on behalf of the legislature for that body's recent appropriation of $150,000 toward the total construction cost.

 The first phase of the reconstruction will include the building's foundation, chimney and the first three courses of wall logs.         

 

       

Press Release: "Cherokee Attack on Fort Dobbs"

PRESS RELEASE

 

Release: Immediate                                                                                                    Contact: Scott Douglas

Date:     2/5/16                                                                                                                    Phone: 704-873-5882

                                                                                                                                               

Cherokee Attack on Fort Dobbs

February 27-28

 

STATESVILLE, N.C. – Fort Dobbs State Historic Site will offer a glimpse of the harrowing days of the Anglo-Cherokee War on February 27-28.  The Cherokee had been allies of the British when the French and Indian War started in 1754, but tensions quickly spiraled into war.  The soldiers at the fort and local settlers were attacked by dozens of warriors in a confusing night time skirmish on Feb. 27. 1760.

The 256th anniversary program will feature living history interpreters portraying provincial soldiers and settlers.  Musket and cannon firing demonstrations, as well as ongoing demonstrations of 18th century military camp life will be featured.  The free program will run 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on Sunday.  A special evening firing demonstration will be held at 6:30 p.m. Saturday.

For more information, call (704) 873-5882 or visit www.fortdobbs.org.

 About Fort Dobbs

Fort Dobbs State Historic Site’s mission is to preserve and interpret the history of Fort Dobbs and North Carolina’s role in the French and Indian War. It is open Tuesday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Special events and living history weekends are offered throughout the year. It is part of the Division of N.C. State Historic Sites within the NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

About the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources

The N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources (NCDNCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s natural and cultural resources to build the social, cultural, educational and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan Kluttz, NCDNCR's mission is to improve the quality of life in our state by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history, libraries and nature in North Carolina by stimulating learning, inspiring creativity, preserving the state’s history, conserving the state’s natural heritage, encouraging recreation and cultural tourism, and promoting economic development.

NCDNCR includes 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, two science museums, three aquariums and Jennette’s Pier, 39 state parks and recreation areas, the N.C.  Zoo, the nation's first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the State Archives, the N.C. Arts Council, State Preservation Office and the Office of State Archaeology, along with the Division of Land and Water Stewardship. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov. ###