From Interstate 40, take either US 21 North (exit 151) or NC 115 North (exit. 150). From US 21, turn left onto Fort Dobbs Road. From NC 115, veer right onto S. Chipley Ford Road, then turn right onto Fort Dobbs Road.



Fort Dobbs is open 9:00 am-5:00 pm each Tuesday-Saturday (except for major holidays) with interpretive tours daily. General admission is free, however fees are charged for field trips.

The site is also open for special events and by appointment. Contact site staff for arrangements.



Historic Site: The original site of Fort Dobbs and its accompanying well are marked for viewing.

Visitor Center : In 1940, the Daughters of the American Revolution arranged for the construction of a log cabin on the grounds of the fort. The cabin was built of 19th century logs from three existing Iredell County structures.  The cabin currently houses the Petit Sutler gift shop as well as exhibits featuring many of the artifacts found at the site and a scaled replica of the 1756 fort.

Picnic Shelter: A covered shelter with picnic tables, restrooms and a small playground is located at the site.

Trail: A nature trail, approximately one-half-mile long, features native wild plants and trees. The trail is not handicapped accessible at this time.

Petit Sutler: The Petit Sutler shop, located in the Visitor Center, is open Tuesday-Saturday from 9-5 and during special event weekends. It offers a wide variety of books, colonial toys and games and Fort Dobbs related items.  The Petit Sutler accepts cash, check, MasterCard and Visa.  Phone orders are accepted.

Parking: An easily accessible parking lot is available adjacent to the site. Motorcoach parking is available. Field parking is opened for special events.


Groups: Please contact site staff for use restrictions, requirements and guidelines.

Metal Detecting / Relic Hunting:  The North Carolina Archaeological Resources Protection Act prohibits a person from excavating, removing, damaging or otherwise altering or defacing an archeological resource located on state lands.  The act declares that a person who violates the above provisions, or employs another person to do so, shall be fined, upon conviction, not more than $2,000 or imprisoned not more than six months, or both, for each day of continued violation. The Act authorizes the Department of Administration, in consultation with the Department of Cultural Resources, to assess a civil penalty of not more than $5,000 against any person who violates such provisions. The act directs the Department of Administration, in determining the amount of the penalty, to consider the extent of the harm caused by the violation and the cost of rectifying the damage. Directs the department to send notice by registered or certified mail of such an assessment to the person being assessed and authorizes the department to institute a civil action in the Superior Court of Wake County if the person being assessed fails to pay the assessment. The act authorizes the department to use the assessed funds to rectify the damage to archeological resources or to otherwise effectuate the purposes of this article. Finally, the act declares that all archeological resources with respect to which a criminal violation has occurred, and all vehicles and equipment used in connection with such violation, shall be subject to forfeiture to the state.